Event information

This is a Fellow and BELMAS only event, booking is essential.

At this Fellow roundtable, which is co-hosted by the Chartered College of Teaching and BELMAS (British Educational Leadership, Management & Administration Society), researchers and practitioners will present evidence on the structural and pervasive nature of race discrimination and racial inequality and its contemporary manifestations in schools and discuss their personal experiences as teachers and school leaders.

The roundtables will start with a series of four presentations by leading experts in the field, followed by brief Q&As, before the floor will be opened for in-depth roundtable discussions during which participants will be able to explore the issue of diversity in their own settings and what could be done to address it.

Please find the detailed programme, abstracts and bios of the speakers below.

13.00 – Arrivals, Registration & light lunch
13.45 – Just what is race and what’s it doing in a nice field like school leadership?, Dr Christine Callender, UCL Institute of Education
14.05 – ‘Confronting prejudice’: Taking on institutional structures and cultures in the recruitment, development, retention and progression of BAME teachers, Prof Paul Miller, University of Greenwich
14.25 – Q&A
14.35 – Tea break
14.50 – Diversity in Organisations is fundamental to growth and success, as well as the moral imperative, Naheeda Maharasingam FCCT, Headteacher Rathfern Primary School, London
15.10 – BAME the way forward – growth, Sufian Sadiq, Director of Teaching School for Chiltern Learning Trust
15.30 – Q&A
15.40 – Roundtable discussions
16.20 – Closing Remarks

Just what is race and what’s it doing in a nice field like school leadership?

Christine Callender, UCL Institute of Education, UK

Discussions about the lack of school leaders from minoritized backgrounds have a long tradition in England. Much of this debate has centred around issues of representation, progression and unequal access to leadership positions without examining the ways in which schools may covertly and/or overtly contribute to processes of exclusion, silencing and invisibilization. This presentation starts from the position that the teacher workforce, including school leadership should reflect the communities it serves. There are many compelling reasons for this, not least the fact that schools, pupils and communities all benefit from the diversity that minoritized leaders bring to their roles. Critically engaging with questions about race and school leadership is integral to both understanding and resolving what the Runnymede Trust/NASUWT describe as ‘an almost endemic problem at the leadership levels of teaching’ (2017) and the challenges involved in breaking through the ‘invisible glass-ceiling and widespread perception among SLTs that BME teachers have a certain level and don’t go beyond it’ (Runnymede/NUT, 2017). This involves meaningful and honest conversation about the structural and pervasive nature of race discrimination and racial inequality and its contemporary manifestations in schools.

Key words: Race, school leadership, teachers

Biography

Christine is an Associate Professor in Education at UCL Institute of Education, London and a Senior Fellow of the HEA. She has worked in schools, colleges and in the higher education sector for over 25 years and has undertaken consultancies nationally and internationally. Christine is the co-convenor of the BELMAS Race and Leadership Research Interest Group and her research interests are in the areas of race, equality and diversity in teacher education, the experiences of BME teachers, particularly males, race and leadership and the use of critical race theory and critical whiteness studies as theoretical, methodological and analytic lenses to examine race and ethnicity in education.

‘Confronting prejudice’: Taking on institutional structures and cultures in the recruitment, development, retention and progression of BAME teachers

Paul Miller, School of Education, University of Greenwich, UK

The recruitment, development, retention and progression of teachers of BAME heritage is a matter of much debate and research. However, much of these debates, and a significant proportion of existing research is framed in the context of individual instead of institutional responsibility, despite a large body of research and other evidence that institutional racism is a feature of many of the UK’s educational institutions. This paper presents case study evidence from three headteachers of Multi-Academy Trusts (MATs) in England, who have taken a range of positive actions in their schools to support the recruitment, development, retention and progression of staff of BAME heritage. This paper makes a contribution to the literature through its departure from majority of the existing research on BAME staffing which focuses on barriers, by focusing on strategies that work and how. The paper also extends the current theoretical base by examining the actions of headteachers through the literature on social justice leadership, courageous leadership and organisational cultural change.

Key words: Positive actions, race discrimination, BAME, England, teachers

Biography

Paul W. Miller, PhD, is Head of the School of Education, and Professor of Educational Leadership & Social Justice, School of Education, University of Greenwich. He is President of the Commonwealth Council for Educational Administration & Management (CCEAM); a Member of Council of the British Educational Leadership Administration Society (BELMAS); where he is also Co-convenor of the Race & Educational Leadership Research Interest Group. He has written substantially on racism and school leadership in England and he is an Invited Member of the UK Department for Education (DfE) Teacher Diversity Steering Group/ Roundtable.

Diversity in Organisations is fundamental to growth and success, as well as the moral imperative

Naheeda Maharasingam FCCT, Headteacher Rathfern Primary School, London

Naheeda Maharasingam is a Local Leader of Education (LLE), a Fellow of the Chartered College of Teaching and Leader of Rathfern CCT Teacher Research Network. She is currently Head teacher at Rathfern Primary School, a diverse and dynamic inner London primary school. She is passionate about values which enrich her vision and permeate her school culture, with a focus on disrupting the trajectory for disadvantaged pupils.

Naheeda will share her reflections as a leader on the relationships between equity, diversity and inclusion.

BAME the way forward – Growth

Sufian is a talented teacher with extensive management experience within the education sector. He is a Fellow of the Chartered College of Teaching and holds various roles with awarding bodies, specialising in quality assurance, examination and assessment. He is the Director of Teaching School for Chiltern Learning Trust, a successful Multi-Academy Trust. He is passionate about making a difference to young people and also holds management positions with a number of other charitable and voluntary sector organisations that are committed to improving the lives of young people.

Event details

Event date
April 8, 2020
Event time
1:45 pm - 5:00 pm
Event location
City Hall, Cm Rm 5, The Queen's Walk, London SE1 2AA
Event organiser
Chartered College of Teaching

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