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Case Study: An exploration of the benefits of small strategies to improve independence for an autistic child with ADHD in a Year 5 maths lesson.

In the following video case study, teaching assistant, Jo Mead, shares her approach to supporting an autistic child with ADHD in a primary setting.

Before watching the video, we invite you to read about Jo Mead’s journey working as a teaching assistant.

My name is Jo Mead. I am a Teaching Assistant working with individual children with special educational needs in a mainstream primary school in Kent. I originally qualified as a nurse but found that working in a primary school suited me better once I became a parent. 

I began supporting children with low age-related attainment in maths and became fascinated in the way children learn (or don’t learn). My next role saw me working with a ‘looked-after child’ in the same school, a role I found much more challenging than I had expected. I started to find out more about what gets in the way of some children thinking and learning and how these barriers can be reduced. Following this, I started to work with a child in Reception who had recently been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). My job share partner and I learned so much from this inspiring child (and subsequent others) who is now flourishing in a local special school in Year 11.

I have continued to work with individual children to enable and encourage inclusion in mainstream schools because I passionately believe that individuals and society benefit when children learn in inclusive classrooms.

The video below is divided into the following sections:

0.24 – Introduction

1.13 – What are the specific needs of the student you work with?

2.14 – What challenges did the student experience in the classroom?

4.08 – What approach did you take to overcome these challenges? What evidence-base informed your approach?

7.50 – What impact did this approach have on the student’s academic outcomes?

8.13 – What impact did this approach have on the student’s wellbeing and relationships in the classroom?

9.38 – What were the strengths and limitations of this approach?

11.13 – What are your top tips for other teaching assistants working with students with SEND?

N.B. Captions to be uploaded shortly.

Read Jo Mead’s full Impact article here: https://my.chartered.college/impact_article/an-exploration-of-the-benefits-of-small-strategies-to-improve-independence-for-an-autistic-child-with-adhd-in-a-year-5-maths-lesson/

 

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    References
    1. Bandura A (1986) Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social Cognitive Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
    2. Hudry K, Leadbitter K, Temple K et al. (2010) Pre-schoolers with autism show greater impairment in receptive compared with expressive language abilities. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders 45(6): 681–690.
    3. Mead, J. (2022) An exploration of the benefits of small strategies to improve independence for an autistic child with ADHD in a Year 5 maths lesson. Impact - Journal of the Chartered College of Teaching 16: 40-42
    4. Sweller J (1998) Cognitive load during problem solving: Effects on learning. Cognitive Science 12: 257–285
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