Supporting pupil mental health: Bullying and loneliness

Introduction

This bitesize CPD collection is part of a series of online micro learning units for teachers and school leaders on supporting pupil mental health and wellbeing in practice. The units offer insights into best practice in supporting children and young people, building on the latest evidence base. They are designed to develop knowledge around a range of topics that now form part of the statutory Relationship, Sex and Health Education (RSHE) curriculum, supporting teachers to consider how they might most effectively deliver these topics as part of the curriculum. Specifically, topics covered include:

  • Anxiety
  • Sleep and screen time
  • Bullying and loneliness
  • Trauma
  • Eating disorders
  • Self harm
  • Addiction
  • Bereavement
  • Social media / online usage.

 

These online micro learning units incorporate a range of content types to support professional learning and reflective practice, including:

  • Recordings from ‘Pedagogy in practice’ – a webinar series developed in partnership with The Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH) with a focus on how to teach key topics aligned with the RSHE curriculum
  • Access to a Padlet with ideas and resources shared by teachers
  • Case studies from practising teachers and school leaders and research reviews summarising the latest evidence base
  • Reflective questions to support learning and reading lists signposting further sources and support.

 

This online learning is being supported by the Bupa Foundation and the Association of Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH).

 

Webinar

In this webinar, Dr Verity Jones discusses how racism (as a form of bullying) impacts the mental health and wellbeing of children aged nine to 11 years old, drawing on findings from ongoing interdisciplinary research involving experts in education, creative art and psychology. Verity considers the strategies children use to cope with bullying and loneliness and how teachers and schools can work towards inclusive educational experiences. The webinar also features a presentation by Sharon Mangoma (MCCT) on encouraging students to reflect upon and perform intentional acts of kindness within the school context. Panelists Harriet Gill (Managing Director of Education and Wellbeing, Coram Life Education) and Jenny Barksfield (Deputy CEO and Director of Education, PSHE Association) discuss questions raised during the webinar. Further information can be found on the event page on our Video Hub.

 

 

Padlet

This Padlet includes resources and ideas shared by practitioners during the webinar.

 

 

Made with Padlet

 

Articles and case studies

Hear about approaches to addressing different forms of bullying, supporting mental health and wellbeing and developing pastoral initiatives. We invite you to make notes on the approaches and research reported on in these articles to inform your own next steps and consider how you might apply some of these insights in your own setting.

Photo by Zoey Tian on Unsplash
A whole-school approach to supporting students with LGBTQ+ identities
Photo by Alex on Unsplash|Figure 1: The Mental Health and Wellbeing Continuum (Rebholz
Pop-up wellbeing spaces: A component of ‘a model of good practice to promote mental health and wellbeing within the secondary school setting’
How can a peer mentoring programme be developed to help meet pastoral care priorities?
Challenging sexism and gender stereotypes in education
The impact of racism on children’s mental health

Research review

This research review discusses different types of bullying and effective strategies to reduce bullying.

Effective strategies to reduce bullying in schools

Reflective questions

  • Do you think a whole school approach to bullying could work in your setting?
  • What are students’ attitudes towards bullying in your school?
  • What proactive strategies do you use to support your students to understand bullying and loneliness in your context?
  • What new strategies might you begin to apply in your context?
  • What are the barriers to talking about racism in your context and how might these barriers be overcome?